Posts tagged ‘smooth’

Redbreast 12 Year Irish Whiskey Review

Redbreast 12Today, I am reviewing Redbreast 12 year, a single pot still whiskey from the Midleton Distillery in Cork.  A single pot still whiskey is very similar to a single malt, with the only difference being that a single pot still whiskey includes both malted and unmalted barley in the mash bill.  Like other Irish whiskeys, Redbreast is triple distilled.  The Redbreast label is also home to a 15 year edition and a 12 year cask strength bottling in addition to the standard 12 year, which is bottled at 80 proof (40% abv).

On the nose, Redbreast is a quite sweet spirit.  There are notes of Red Delicious apples, honey, some light caramel, all backed up by a background mix of floral notes and barley.  The nose is rather complex for how light it is.  Unfortunately, I think this whiskey trails off after the nose.  The palate is very light with some sweet malt and caramel bread pudding notes.  The finish is short and slightly malty, with a hint of apples.  But, I really had to go seeking for flavors on the finish.

Overall, this is a fine whiskey, one of the finer Irish whiskeys I have had.  This one is beyond drinkable, and I suspect that would make it a great compliment in a Hot Toddy.  However, if you are looking for something to sip slow, this one lacks depth.  The tasting experience is pleasant, but not very original in my opinion.  I definitely like this whiskey, but I think its drinkability holds back its depth.  The 12 yr. cask strength is very high up on my whiskeys to try, though.  I am anxious to see what could happen to this spirit at a higher proof.  My grade: C.  Price:  $40-45/750ml.  This is a good whiskey, but it is definitely not my favorite.  That said, if you enjoy a light, fruity, malty spirit, Redbreast 12 could be your new cabinet staple.  Give it a try for yourself and let it ride!

Gentleman Jack Tennessee Whiskey Review

I have recently seen several ads for Gentleman Jack on the internet and the television, so I thought I should get a review of this one so you can decide whether you want to spend your hard earned money on this Tennessee classic.  As I mentioned in my review of Old No. 7, Tennessee whiskey is notably different than bourbon because the whiskey is charcoal filtered prior to going into the oak.  The whiskey comes right off the stills and goes through a charcoal filter, smoothing the whiskey out and extracting possible contaminants.  This might seem like a great idea, but it isn’t all great.  Just like chill filtration, charcoal filtering runs the risk of extracting flavor in addition to contaminants.

Gentleman Jack is different from the classic Old No. 7 in that Gentleman Jack is filtered through the charcoal twice.  The result of that second round of charcoal filtration is that Gentleman Jack is ludicrously drinkable.  I hate to use the word “smooth” to describe whiskey, but Gentleman Jack fits that bill perfectly.  Not surprisingly, it is bottled at 80 proof, but it drinks like its the same strength as a sherry or a port.  Be careful with this stuff.  Drink it responsibly.  It can spiral downhill quickly with this luxuriously smooth Tennessee whiskey.Gentleman Jack

Now that my warning is out of the way, I can give you my notes.  On the nose, this smells a lot like Jack Daniel’s Old No. 7, but a bit weaker.  That banana thing is still going on, with some honey, corn, and oak, but it is not the rich nose of Old No. 7.  On the palate, this whiskey is a whisper.  It is soft and a little watery.  It is mostly sweet, with a little vanilla and honey, and maybe a little bit of banana.  The finish barely even exists.  Seriously, I had to remind myself I just drank whiskey.  Honestly, there might be some oak, but there isn’t much in this finish.

Overall, the highlight of Gentleman Jack is its drinkability.  So, if you have a friend or significant other that has been looking for a drinkable whiskey to have at a party, look no further than this one.  If you are a connoisseur of port and you want to expand into American whiskey, this one is a good place to start.  If you love Wild Turkey, I don’t think Gentleman Jack will be up your alley.  But, as always, try it for yourself and let it ride!  My grade: C-.  Price: $30-35/750ml.  A nice, drinkable whiskey, but it is definitely not on my list of whiskeys to buy at that price point.