Posts tagged ‘Rittenhouse’

John E. Fitzgerald Larceny Bourbon Review

Today, I am reviewing John E. Fitzgerald Larceny bourbon.  This is a relatively new product from Heaven Hill Distillery, makers of Elijah Craig, Evan Williams, and Rittenhouse Rye, all fine whiskeys at good prices.  As it is, Larceny has high standards set for it.  It has to live up to Heaven Hill’s tradition of great value, but it also has to live up to its namesake, John E. Fitzgerald.  Fitzgerald was a bourbon maker in the late 19th century, who eventually sold his distillery to Julian Van Winkle to become a treasury agent.  After the sale, Fitzgerald became famous/infamous for sneaking into the Van Winkle distillery to obtain whiskey from his favorite barrels.  Over time, these became known as the “Old Fitzgerald” barrels.  In honor of Fitzgerald’s discerning tastes, Heaven Hill created the Old Fitzgerald line of wheated bourbons.  Larceny is the newest addition to this line, a six-year old bourbon bottled at 92 proof.

Before giving my review, I will openly admit that I am not a huge fan of wheated bourbons.  Maker’s Mark, Weller, and the Old Fitzgerald line tend not to suit my palate as nicely as other bourbons.  That is not to say that I hate all wheated bourbons.  William Larue Weller and W.L. Weller 12 yr. are both very enjoyable (especially the former).  I just want to acknowledge my bias coming into the review.

On the nose, Larceny is dense and rich.  There are notes of caramel, butterscotch, corn, vanilla, and brown sugar.  I think the palate brings the whiskey down, though.  There is a dense caramel sweetness, balanced by hearty cereal grain flavors.  The back of the palate picks up cinnamon and drying oak spices.  The finish is medium to short, with the oak remaining along with some dense caramel.

Overall, this is a solid wheated bourbon.  It is not especially expensive (usually around $25/750 ml), which makes it a very good value if you enjoy wheated bourbon.  In most stores, this is cheaper than Maker’s Mark, which makes Larceny the better buy.  However, I don’t see too much between them in flavor profiles.  Larceny is not the bourbon for me, but that does not mean it isn’t the bourbon for you.  My Grade: C-.  Price: $25-30/750ml.  For me, I leave this one on the shelf.  There are better whiskeys at the price point, and I don’t think this would make a great mixer.

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Jameson Irish Whiskey Review

Today, I am reviewing Jameson Irish Whiskey.  I have had several requests for a review of this whiskey, so I am finally getting around to it.  Jameson is one of the most famous whiskeys in the world, and definitely the most famous Irish Whiskey.  Simply put, Irish whiskey is just whiskey from Ireland, just like Scotch is whisky from Scotland.  Irish whiskeys are typically made from malted barley, and they are often triple distilled.  Triple distillation means that there are three processes of distillation required/used to separate the water content from the mash during the boil.  There are some Scotch whiskies that are triple distilled, but most of them are double distilled.  The primary result of triple distillation in the finished whiskey is a smoother taste, although it does not  mean the whiskey will taste better, just different.

The first thing you will probably notice after you pour a glass of Jameson is the color.  Jameson is a rich gold, much different from the amber color of bourbon.  On the nose, Jameson is beautiful.  There are notes of agave, candied yams, cereals, dense honey, and light florals.  The palate is where Jameson takes a disappointing turn for me.  The palate is light-bodied, and the honey and floral notes are dominant with some heather and cereal in the background providing some heft.  The finish is smooth, but very short.  Some of the cereal grains remain briefly, but that is it.

Overall, Jameson is a fine whiskey, and it is usually available for $25-30/750 ml.  I really like the nose on this one, but the palate and finish don’t do too much for me.  The whiskey is bottled at 80 proof, and it is very drinkable.  It sacrifices complexity for smoothness, which makes it a great choice for somebody looking to buy their first bottle of whiskey.  My grade: C.  Price: $25-30/750ml.  This is a favorite of many, and I enjoy it, but it is usually a few dollars more than I am looking to spend on a whiskey of this quality.

The Ideal Value Liquor Cabinet (Autumn Edition)

Well, autumn is upon us, and it is time to start planning your fall liquor cabinet.  Quite frankly, fall is one of my favorite seasons to drink great value whiskey.  As with my summer edition of the ideal liquor cabinet, I think a quality liquor cabinet should have variety, and it should have a few key components.  Building a quality liquor cabinet is like building a house; once you have a foundation down, you can go anywhere.  Of course, like anything pertaining to whiskey, it all depends on your palate.  Since my palate varies depending on the season (and sometimes the day), the possibilities for an ideal liquor cabinet are endless.  For what it’s worth, here are my thoughts on an awesome fall liquor cabinet on a budget.

You should have a solid staple.  My summer suggestion for a great staple was Buffalo Trace, and I will stand by that whiskey as the leaves begin to change.  https://bargainbourbon.com/2012/03/31/buffalo-trace-review/

You should have a solid seasonal whiskey.  Since fall is such a great time to enjoy whiskey, there are many options for my favorite fall seasonal whiskey.  For the money, I think the best option is Rittenhouse Rye Bottled-in-Bond.  It is spicy and sweet, like good pumpkin pie.  Plus, it is a great value buy.  https://bargainbourbon.com/2012/07/28/rittenhouse-rye-review/

You should have a mixer.  Not everybody that comes over to your house for dinner will want their whiskey straight up, so it is important to have something in the cabinet that you don’t mind seeing go into an Old-Fashioned, Mint Julep, Manhattan, etc.  For fall, I recommend Old Grand-Dad Bonded.  It is a fine whiskey that I enjoy sipping straight, and it has a nice rye zip for a cocktail.  However, it costs under $20, and it is not the best whiskey in the cabinet, so I don’t mind if somebody throws a splash or two in a cocktail.  https://bargainbourbon.com/2012/08/17/old-grand-dad-bonded-review/

If I had a little money left over, I would probably go for a couple of my favorite bottles of whiskey that fit the season well.  These are the ones that come out on special occasions and will last me into December.  If I were me (with a little extra dough), I would get a bottle of Aberlour A’Bunadh and a bottle of Laphroaig Quarter Cask.  I have yet to review either one of these whiskys, but they are both fantastic Scotches around $60 a bottle.  The Aberlour is sweet, full, lightly floral, and oaky.  The Laphroaig Quarter Cask is a lot like the 10 yr. (https://bargainbourbon.com/2012/08/25/laphroaig-10-year-review/), but the former has more complexity, more balance, and a bigger influence from the cask.  Don’t worry, though, it still has monstrous helpings of peat and smoke.  As my rooomate, Chris Broadwell, says “If you can’t go camping this fall, drink Laphroaig.”

Those are my thoughts on the ideal autumn liquor cabinet.  What whiskeys did I leave out?  Which ones did I get right?  What does your autumn liquor cabinet look like?

My Favorite Whiskeys by Price Point

I am often asked, “What’s your favorite whiskey?”  Honestly, that is like asking me to name a favorite child, favorite beer, favorite song, or favorite movie.  I have many favorites, and many of these depend on my mood, and the money in my wallet.  However, I have recently had a request from my good friend, Kate at http://www.kateampersand.com/ for some recommendations for how to give the gift of whiskey.  I have reviewed about 40 whiskeys on the site so far, and here are my favorite whiskeys out of those 40 at different price points.  The prices used are the approximate prices for 750ml of the whiskey.

Best Whiskey under $20:  Old Grand-Dad Bottled-in-Bond (https://bargainbourbon.com/2012/08/17/old-grand-dad-bonded-review/).  This is a very good, rye forward bourbon, with a lot of power.  It doesn’t have the complexity of some other high rye bourbons, but it is hard to beat for $18 a bottle.

Runner-up under $20:  Four Roses Yellow Label (https://bargainbourbon.com/2012/03/14/four-roses-yellow-label-review/).  In comparison to the power of Old Grand-Dad (bottled at 100 proof), the Yellow Label is a delicate rye-forward bourbon.  There is a lot of light spice that tingles the tongue and the nostrils, but it doesn’t quite have the depth of Old Grand-Dad.  Nevertheless, Four Roses Yellow Label is a great buy.

Best Whiskey under $25:  Rittenhouse Rye Bottled-in-Bond (https://bargainbourbon.com/2012/07/28/rittenhouse-rye-review/).  Not only is this whiskey a great value, it is a great whiskey.  There is a ton of complexity, ranging from spiciness to sweetness to a rich earthiness.  If you want to impress somebody, buy them this whiskey for their birthday.  Trust me, they will think you spent a good amount on it (especially if you put it in a fancy decanter since the bottle design is not especially flattering).

Runner-up Under $25:  McClelland’s Speyside (https://bargainbourbon.com/2012/07/30/comparison-review-scotch-styles-mcclellands-speyside-vs-mcclellands-lowland/).  This is a fine single-malt Scotch for the price.  It has all the delicacy of a Speyside, with the craft necessary to give it some soft chocolate and smoke flavors that give it character.  (It should be mentioned that if you can find Wild Turkey 101, Buffalo Trace, Eagle Rare 10 yr. Single Barrel, or Jim Beam Devil’s Cut for under $25, they are even better.  However, I live in Boston where I am not quite so lucky.)

Best Whiskey under $30:  Rittenhouse Rye Bottled-in-Bond.  It still reigns supreme; it’s just that good.

Runner-up under $30:  Buffalo Trace (https://bargainbourbon.com/2012/03/31/buffalo-trace-review/).  It is the bourbon that turned me on to bourbon a number of years ago, and it continues to impress.  It is not overly sweet, leaving the vanilla to be blended perfectly.  It is like eating a perfectly balanced cheesecake (sort of).

Best Whiskey under $35:  Russell’s Reserve 10 yr (https://bargainbourbon.com/2012/07/12/russells-reserve-10-year-bourbon-review/).  Finally, Rittenhouse was dethroned.  Every time I drink Russell’s Reserve, I am amazed at how wonderfully structured it is.  It is like reading a great novel, where the plot unfolds precisely when it should.

Runner-up under $35:  W.L. Weller 12 yr (https://bargainbourbon.com/2012/08/28/w-l-weller-12-year-review/).  This is exactly what a wheated bourbon can achieve.  It is sweet, but complex, demonstrating the many phases of a sweetness.  It reminds me of eating buttermilk pancakes smothered in cinnamon sugar and maple syrup (except not as filling).

Best Whiskey under $40:  Four Roses Single Barrel (https://bargainbourbon.com/2012/08/14/four-roses-single-barrel-review/).  Although this is a single barrel whiskey (meaning there will be some difference between batches), I’ve never had a bad batch of this whiskey.  It is plainly brilliant.  It has the all the spicy rye character of Four Roses Small Batch, but it demonstrates a whole other layer of complexity with a sweet, dark palate.

Runner-up under $40:  Russell’s Reserve 10 yr.  It has rightly remained high on my list even at a higher price point.

Best Whiskey under $50:  Bunnahabhain 12 yr (https://bargainbourbon.com/2012/08/22/bunnahabhain-12-year-review/).  This is really a brilliant Islay whisky.  The sherry influence is strong, but the Islay peat hangs around to provide a perfect balance.  Although this is not a traditional Islay whisky, it is my favorite value.

Runner-up under $50:  Four Roses Single Barrel.  Yes, it can compete with whiskeys that reach above its price point.

Best Whiskey under $60:  Booker’s Small Batch Bourbon (https://bargainbourbon.com/2012/06/21/comparison-review-bookers-vs-noahs-mill/).  This is my favorite whiskey to date, and it should only be given to a true whiskey lover who you love very much.  It is a full, robust whiskey, providing a complexity and intensity rarely seen elsewhere in the bourbon world under $60.  (I have seen Booker’s for as cheap as $47.  If you see it around that price, snatch up a bottle.)

Runner-up under $60:  Bunnahabhain 12 yr.  As many of you are aware, Scotch is expensive.  However, I have yet to find a better value among Single Malt Scotch than Bunnahabhain.

I am stopping at $60, because most people that read this blog are seeking value bourbons.  If you like some recommendations for higher price ranges, feel free to email me at thedagupeir@gmail.com.  I would also recommend that you read the reviews of these whiskeys before purchasing them, just to make sure it sounds like something that will truly be enjoyed by whoever is its lucky recipient.  Let it ride!

Rittenhouse Rye Review

It is widely known that I love bourbon.  However, my enjoyment of whiskey is not limited strictly to bourbon.  My goal for this blog is to expose good whiskeys at good prices.  The other day I had the opportunity to drink a whiskey that certainly fit that bill – Rittenhouse Rye Bottled-in-Bond.

Rittenhouse is a rye whiskey made at the Brown Forman Distillery and distributed by Heaven Hill.  Rye whiskey is like other whiskeys in that it has to be made from cereal grains and at least 80 proof.  Like bourbon with corn, rye whiskey must be made from at least 51% rye grain.  Rye whiskeys can be made anywhere, but they are most commonly made in either Canada or the United States.  Rye is a very flavorful grain, which tends to make rye whiskeys a big, bold flavor profile.  If you enjoy rye-forward bourbons like Wild Turkey and Four Roses, then it is definitely worth taking a look into some rye whiskeys.  Rittenhouse is a great place to start.

Rittenhouse Rye is also “Bottled-in-Bond,” which means that it is bottled at 100 proof and made under specific government regulations.  In 1896, when the U.S. government first passed the act clarifying what whiskey should be, being bottled-in-bond was a measure of the quality of the whiskey.  Mostly, the term means that the whiskey was distilled all in one season (not batched between different whiskeys from different years) and aged at least four years in a federally observed warehouse.  Nowadays, the craft whiskey market is a serious business such that being bottled-in-bond does not mean as much in 2012 as it did in 1896.  Nevertheless, it is interesting to note that Rittenhouse Rye is Bottled-in-Bond.

On the nose, Rittenhouse is purely delicious.  The two most prominent notes are the sweet aromas of honey and vanilla.  However, there is a fantastic underbelly to the nose containing floral notes (lavender, lilac) and spiced notes (cinnamon, nutmeg, ginger).  The most noticeable flavor once you take a sip is the earthy, spicy rye character to the whiskey.  However, it is balanced very well by sweet cinnamon and ginger and a healthy helping of vanilla.  The finish is long and very good, filled with sweet spice and earthy flavors.  The finish hits at first with cinnamon and rye notes, and moves into the more hearty notes reminiscent of herbal tea.  The spiciness and sweetness often resurge as the whiskey goes on.

Overall, this is a fantastic whiskey.  There is a ton going on here, but it is all in good balance and at a great price.  This is a rare find where I’m at, but I usually see it for around $25 if it’s in stock.  Hopefully this review will kick start a journey outside the comforting confines of bourbon whiskey.  I will try to do some more non-bourbon value reviews in the coming weeks.  My grade: B+.  Price: $20-25/750ml.  This is a great pour at a great price.  This is a pour that you can have often, and your friends will be very impressed.