Posts tagged ‘Christmas’

Highland Park 15 Year-Old Scotch Review

If you’re drinking in wintertime, why not drink whisky from the Scottish distillery closest to the Arctic Circle?  If you think Santa is not a frequent guest at the Highland Park visitor’s centre, then you know very little about the man in red.  All of this to say that today’s thoughts pertain to Highland Park 15 year-old.  Unfortunately, as I am writing this, Highland Park 15 is no longer being bottled by the distillery, as it has been replaced with the NAS Dark Origins release (I have yet to get my hands on a bottle of Dark Origins, but I will review it as soon as I do).  HP15 is aged primarily in American Oak ex-Sherry casks, and most of those casks are refill casks.  This has a profound impact on the whisky, as we shall see.  Highland Park 15 year-old is bottled at 86 proof (43% abv).

Trust me, the cookies and cocoa are all smoke and mirrors – Santa is a single malt man.

The entrance to this whisky is a great deal smokier than the 12 yr.  The nose has some lemon, lime, burning figs, wood smoke, burning diesel, and toasted coconut.  The palate is sweet and bitter, sugared limes, figs, dates, burning raisins, wood smoke, and earthy peat.  The finish starts in with bitterroot, peat, and a rolling smoke.  There is a slight twinge of heather in the finish, balancing the smoke.

The different casking in the 15 year compared to the 12 year allows the subtle smokiness of Highland Park to show itself a bit more, as well as bringing some mild citrus notes through this one.  It’s a different expression from the 12 year, not just the same whisky with 3 more years under its belt, and an expression I like every bit as much as the beloved HP12.  My grade: B+.  Price: $90-100/750ml.  Like I said, this whisky can still be found floating around liquor shops, especially here in the United States, but they will not be here forever, an unfortunate truth of life.

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Top Ten Occasions to Drink Bourbon

Of course, bourbon can be enjoyed any time.  As my roommate Chris likes to say, “I drink three times a year, my Birthday, New Year’s, and any time I damn well please.”  That said, good bourbon deserves company and good times, which is why I present my Top Ten Occasions to Drink Bourbon.

10. After Work – I always enjoy relaxing after a stressful day at work with a glass of good bourbon to celebrate not having to go back to work until tomorrow.

Photo Courtesy: whiskydisks.com

Photo Courtesy: whiskydisks.com

9. Fourth of July – The perfect time to celebrate America’s native spirit is on America’s Independence Day.  It would rank higher if it weren’t so damn hot in July.  Drinking bourbon rarely cools me down like a few cold beers.

8. Funeral – This might seem odd, but I do believe it is appropriate to toast the good life of a good friend by opening a special bottle of bourbon.

7. Birthday – Of course, nothing celebrates a good friend like a good bottle drank with good friends.

6. New Year’s Eve – In my mind, every year should start and end with bourbon.

5. Christmas – The family is all gathered together, which makes Christmas a good time to crack a bottle of bourbon.  This is also a great opportunity to win bourbon converts.

4. Thanksgiving – Guess what I am thankful for… bourbon.

3. Arbor Day – So often, we forget to thank the tall American White oaks that have sacrificed themselves to impart the soft flavors of their wood into our bourbon.  I like to salute them with a few drinks on Arbor Day.

2. Birth of a Child – Just like a child, bourbon is born raw and uncouth.  Over time, it ages, smoothing out the rough edges on a journey to a wonderful finished product.

1. A Wedding – Really, bourbon is a lot like a wedding.  A wedding brings people together into one family.  Bourbon brings ingredients together into one, brilliant spirit.  Plus, there is a lot to celebrate on a wedding, which makes it my favorite time to open up a good bottle and share the joy of bourbon.

Those are my favorite occasions to drink bourbon.  What are yours?

Merry Christmas from Bargain Bourbon,

Phil

 

Bourbon Myths

I started Bourbon for Beginners with the intention of disproving one of the most outrageous myths about bourbon – the more expensive a whiskey is, the better a whiskey is.  As I hope to have proven in the several months I’ve had the blog up and running, that is simply not true.  In addition, I have hoped to distill the rumor that tasting and enjoying whiskey is an objective endeavor.  Tasting whiskey is firmly a subjective pursuit, varying greatly from person to person.

However, there are still more myths about bourbon (and whiskey at large) to be debunked.

1.  The older a whiskey is, the better a whiskey is.  This is simply not true, as I hoped to show in my comparison review of Booker’s and Noah’s Mill.  Booker’s is only aged between 6 and 8 years, while Noah’s Mill is aged at least 15 years.  However, while they are both fantastic whiskeys, I definitely prefer Booker’s.  All aging a whiskey does is give the whiskey a different character than when it was young.  What is true is that older whiskeys tend to be more expensive because they are more rare and harder to find.  The best way to find out whether a younger or an older whiskey is better is to go out and drink the whiskey for yourself, which brings me to the second bourbon myth I’d like to debunk…

2.  The only proper way to drink bourbon is straight up and neat.  I used to believe very strongly in this myth, but it is also not true.  I recently had the opportunity to try Thomas H. Handy Sazerac Rye Whiskey, one of the esteemed offerings from Buffalo Trace’s Antique Collection.  As a barrel-strength whiskey, it was a little tight in its flavors.  However, after adding a few drops of water, Thomas Handy opened up to me and exploded across my taste buds with brilliant spices and vanillas in perfect balance.  I suppose you could say I had a conversion experience.  That being said, I still prefer drinking most whiskeys neat, but a splash of water can sometimes do wonders for opening up a whiskey.  Of course, if you bought the drink, you can drink it however you would like.  I enjoy the fullness of whiskey, so I don’t usually like it on the rocks because chilling the whiskey usually dulls the palate in my opinion.  But as I have said before, there is no right way to drink whiskey; it is a subjective journey.

3.  There are correct tasting notes in a whiskey.  This is only somewhat true.  When I taste a whiskey, the flavors usually conjure up other thoughts in my mind.  Maybe a scent reminds me of Christmas morning, or a finish reminds me of a warm bonfire.  These sensual memories contribute to the tasting notes that I bring out of whiskey.  The reality is that most whiskey simply have a basic profile.  There may be a general sweetness in the finish, but how a person exactly describes that sweetness is entirely subjective.  In other words, if I review a whiskey and said it has a raspberry note in the nose, and you think it smells like strawberries, neither one of us is wrong.  That, my friends, is the beauty of whiskey.

Hopefully, this has been helpful.  Now, when one of your parents’ uppity friends tells you they have The Glenlivet 15-year French Oak Reserve in their liquor cabinet, you can confidently tell that person that The Glenlivet 12-year is every bit as good as the 15-year (at least in my opinion), and they wasted their money just to look fancy.  In the meantime, drink some young, value bourbon and let it ride!