Posts from the ‘Evan Williams’ Category

Evan Williams 1783 Bourbon Review

Sorry for the break in posts, folks, but a few new jobs have made life rather busy of late. Today’s review concerns a relatively new small batch bourbon from the Heaven Hill Distillery: Evan Williams 1783. There is no age statement on the bottle, but Heaven Hill claims that this bourbon is “extra-aged,” but that is hardly an official term.  As far as the term “small batch” on the label, Heaven Hill claims that each batch of this bourbon has a maximum of 80 barrels dumped; I will let you be the judge as to whether or not that constitutes a small batch bourbon. All that said, this bourbon continues on the tradition of well-priced whiskeys from the Heaven Hill Distillery. It is bottled at 86 proof (43%).

On the nose, Evan Williams 1783 presents a classic Heaven Hill bourbon flavor profile. Soft and pleasant, there are notes of caramel, vanilla, and freshly cut oak. The palate is soft and mellow, with classic notes of caramel, vanilla, and oak, but with a little herbal underbelly. The finish is short and sweet with a slight tannic bitterness offsetting the sweet caramel.

Overall, this is a very enjoyable bourbon, perhaps a dangerously drinkable bourbon. It is not overly complex or hard to understand, which makes it a great bourbon to start your bourbon journey with, or keep around the cabinet for those events when not everybody is an experienced bourbon drinker. My grade: C/C+. Price: $15-20/750ml. Truth is, this is one of those really solid bourbons under $20 on the market today.

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Evan Williams Single Barrel 2003 Vintage Bourbon Review

Evan Williams 2003 VintageWith the holidays around the corner, a lot of folks will be enjoying their rare and limited edition whiskeys that only come out on special occasions.  Here at Bargain Bourbon, I believe in the special occasions as much as anybody else, but we ought not lose track of the bourbons that get us through the year, year in and year out.  One such bourbon for me is the Evan Williams Single Barrel Series.  The subject of today’s review is the 2003 Vintage, barrel #603, aged 10 years, 3 months, and 18 days.  As always, Evan Williams Single Barrel is bottled at 86.6 proof (43.3% abv).

The nose on this bourbon is classic Evan Williams.  It is sweet with blackberries, raisins, cherries, but it is balanced out with spicier notes of black tea, cloves, and wood shavings.  The palate is dry with maraschino cherries, caramel, and timber.  The palate is fresh and lively, but with a pleasant oakiness to it.  The finish is medium in its length, with warming flavors of caramel hard candies, cherries, and some bitter tannins.

Overall, Heaven Hill has produced another classic bourbon with this barrel and this vintage.  This is a soft, sweet bourbon that goes very well with the spiciness of gingerbread cakes and cookies around the holidays (seriously, try it).  Even though Evan Williams Single Barrel bourbons are not my favorite bourbon profile, they are very good bourbons that consistently hit their mark.  My grade: B.  Price: $30-35/750ml.  In places where this bourbon is available for $20, it is the almost always the best buy on the shelf.

Evan Williams Single Barrel Vintage 2002 Review

Today, I am reviewing a product that I have been looking forward to reviewing for some time.  This is definitely a popular bourbon, both among amateurs and connoisseurs – Evan Williams Single Barrel.  I am reviewing this year’s release, the 2002 Vintage.  For anybody curious, I currently have a bottle from barrel 758 in my cabinet right now.  HH- 055

Evan Williams Single Barrel is just what you might think; it is a vintaged version of Evan Williams Black Label, one of the better value bourbons that is readily available nowadays.  The Single Barrel Vintage series continues in that tradition.  I’m gonna take a moment to continue a plug for Heaven Hill’s ability to create very good whiskeys at very good prices.  With the exception of Larceny, which I was disappointed with, Heaven Hill makes some great value whiskeys (Elijah Craig 12 yr., Rittenhouse Bottled-in-Bond, Evan Williams Black Label).

The Single Barrel vintage series does not put age statements on their bottles; rather, they date their whiskey by indicating when the bourbon was “put in oak.”  It is also always bottled out of a single barrel, so results will vary on the final product, especially from vintage to vintage.  However, every vintage I have tried has been very good.  Evan Williams Single Barrel is bottled at 86.6 proof, and it is usually bottled around 9-10 years old.

On the nose, this bourbon balances nicely between herbal and sweet.  I definitely get notes of orange peel, basil, and cloves.  There is also a healthy sweetness to the nose, with good notes of maple, big black cherry, vanilla, and walnuts.  The palate brings a good amount of substance for only being 86.6 proof.  There are citrus, sweet fruit, and vanilla notes on the entry, and it moves to a warming combination of corn, caramel, and oak.   The finish is medium-length, but very tasty.  Flavors of oak, vanilla, and candied walnuts hang around for a nice while.

Overall, this is very good bourbon.  It is a nice blend of elegance and rugged bourbon quality.  The only note I wasn’t a big fan of was the black cherry that came up now and again on the palate.  However, it is a great bourbon to have around for a daily pour, especially because it won’t blow your doors off.  In some states, it is available for as little as $25/750ml.  That is a great deal for a bourbon of this quality.  The 2003 vintage should be coming out soon, and I have every reason to expect that will be just as solid a bourbon as the 2002 vintage.  My grade: B.  Price: $30-35/750ml.  This is very good stuff, and it won’t break the bank.  This is an ideal bourbon for sipping everyday.

Evan Williams Black Label Review

This is one of the cheapest bourbon whiskeys on the American market today, so it certainly deserves a review on a value bourbon blog.  Evan Williams is a line of products from the Heaven Hill Distillery, which also includes the oft-acclaimed Evan Williams Vintage Single Barrel collection.  The base line “black label” Evan Williams is a bourbon that tends to get people animated wherever their opinion falls concerning Evan Williams.  It seems that people either love or hate this particular bourbon.  Hopefully, I fall somewhere in between…

On the nose, the aroma most prevalent in Evan Williams is rich oak, but there is also raw corny sweetness.  The palate has good body to it, but it isn’t especially complex.  There is a lot of oak on the palate, only to be mutated by prickly spices in the finish.  There are a few whispers of vanilla throughout the Evan Williams experience, but they can be hard to find.

Overall, I am not a huge fan of Evan Williams Black Label.  That being said, for $11 a bottle, Evan Williams is a pretty good buy.  It is a very drinkable bourbon that I would not be offended if a friend of mine wanted to mix.  It is a solid addition to any liquor cabinet.  My grade: C-.  Price: $10-15/750ml.  This is a cabinet staple if you like making bourbon-based mixed drinks for parties.  It is also a fine pour, too.